March Reads – 2018

I felt like I had reading ADD this month. I usually prefer to devote all my attention to one book at a time, but this month there were several times when I realized I had 2-3 books going at once. I would start one book, and then get distracted and start reading another. Here are the four I actually finished reading:

1. On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness by Andrew Peterson (audiobook)

I’m continuing with my youth fiction/fantasy mania. This series (The Wingfeather Saga) was recommended to me by a couple people during my Harry Potter hangover. I listened to the audiobook and really liked it. I’m interested to see where the series goes.

2. Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

I only gave this book 2 stars on Goodreads, but not for the reason most people did. Most of the 1 and 2 star reviews say they could not get past the way this novel was written. I actually loved the premise of this book and Saunders’ experimental organization and format. Saunders writes this story as a series of quotes from the characters. I felt like the ghostly characters were talking directly to me, and the story wasn’t bogged down by “he said…she said…then he said…”

This book takes place when Willie Lincoln died and was buried. Willie wakes up in the graveyard surrounded by a host of strange and, quite frankly, horrific characters who do not realize they have died. Everything changes for these characters as they interact with this sweet young boy and witness an unusual visit from his father, President Lincoln.

So why did I give this book only 2 stars? I did not like some of the content that frequently entered the story. There were multiple sexual references and language used by some of the characters that I did not appreciate. I found myself skimming or skipping over some pages. It was just too much for my taste.

3. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

Why wasn’t this book on my radar sooner? I couldn’t put this book down once I started it. Set in the 1960s, this book tells the story of Lily Owens. Lily is a young teenage girl who finds herself growing up without her mother, running away from her father, and finding a home among a group of African American women on a bee farm. I fell in love with this unique, beautifully flawed cast of characters.

Also, I am thrilled with my colorful, cute copy of this book from the Penguin Drop Caps series.

4. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (audiobook)

Another book I only gave 2 stars! I would have given it 2.5 if that was an option. I heard this book mentioned several times, especially now that the movie is out, and downloaded the audiobook out of curiosity. I almost gave up on this one several times during the first half. I strongly dislike dystopian literature. I also didn’t grow up in the 1980s and don’t play video games. Since those three elements are the basis of this book, I had a hard time getting into it. However, I was intrigued by the overall plot, especially in the second half of the book. I listened to the last 5 hours in only 2 days, but I can’t say I would recommend it.

 

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